u-blox and ARM unveil “cellular M2M kit”

Module maker u-blox has partnered with semiconductor designer ARM on the development of a “cellular kit” for the design of wirelessly connected location-aware devices used to support M2M services.

The companies have branded their joint offering the C027 “Internet of Things Starter Kit” and plan to conduct a demonstration of the technology at this week’s ARM TechCon conference being hosted in California.

Module maker u-blox has partnered with semiconductor designer ARM on the development of a “cellular kit” for the design of wirelessly connected location-aware devices used to support M2M services.

The companies have branded their joint offering the C027 “Internet of Things Starter Kit” and plan to conduct a demonstration of the technology at this week’s ARM TechCon conference being hosted in California.

“The internet is reaching into every aspect of our lives, connecting everything from smartphones and tablets to devices for security, safety, surveillance, navigation, healthcare, convenience and fun,” said Michael Ammann, the vice president of platform partnerships at u-blox (Thalwil, Switzerland).

“To help engineers jump start their design of these types of internet-connected devices, the C027 delivers out-of-the-box wireless internet connectivity based on a compact u-blox 2G, 3G or CDMA cellular modem plus global positioning module,” he added.

ARM (Cambridge, UK) hopes the kit will help developers join its ecosystem and more spur the development of ARM-based Internet of Things technologies.

The company believes the combination of its technology with that of u-blox will dramatically reduce the time required by manufacturers to build carrier-certified gateways, spurring M2M development.

ARM and u-blox say the C027 kit provides support for 2G and 3G technologies as well as satellite tracking technology.

The hardware is also supported by ARM’s open-source “mbed” development platform, providing free software libraries, hardware designs and online tools for prototyping of ARM-based designs.