Sprint completes trial of 400Gbps technology

US operator Sprint says it has successfully carried out a trial of 400Gbps technology that could help to support the rising demand for data services on both fixed and mobile networks.

The operator has been working with network equipment vendor Ciena (Hanover, MD, USA) on the deployment of the high-speed technology, and says the two companies completed the 400Gbps trial in the Silicon Valley area in July.

US operator Sprint says it has successfully carried out a trial of 400Gbps technology that could help to support the rising demand for data services on both fixed and mobile networks.

The operator has been working with network equipment vendor Ciena (Hanover, MD, USA) on the deployment of the high-speed technology, and says the two companies completed the 400Gbps trial in the Silicon Valley area in July.

“Customers have expressed their hunger for higher-speed networks to support their substantial data needs, which we project will only continue to grow exponentially,” said Wayne Ward, the vice president of business and product development for Sprint (Overland Park, KS, USA).

“The 400Gbps trial demonstrates our ability to offer higher speeds with our existing fiber, which means that our customers can feel assured that our network is future proofed to meet their needs as they evolve,” added Ward. “The delivery of 100Gbps and 400Gbps will be critical as we launch our Ethernet Wave Services and support a growing wireless infrastructure.”

Sprint has been upgrading its optical backbone network with Ciena-supplied equipment to support growing usage of applications like streaming high-definition video, telepresence and data-center connectivity.

Earlier this year, the operator completed a trial of 100Gbps technology and it says this has now been integrated into parts of its network.

The operator says that by adding optical technology to “the mix”, it will be able to scale its core-network capability to 40Gbps, initially, and ultimately to 100Gbps and 400Gbps speeds.

Sprint was recently acquired by Japan’s SoftBank (Tokyo) in a move that is likely to provide the number-three wireless player with the funding it needs to speed up its rollout of next-generation network technologies like LTE.

The operator has been under pressure from bigger rivals AT&T (Dallas, TX, USA) and Verizon Wireless (New York City, NY, USA), as well as a resurgent T-Mobile (Bellevue, WA, USA), and saw its net loss widen to $1.6 billion for the three months ending June, from $643 million for the same period a year earlier.