Siemens and Teradata team up on big data for smart grids

Siemens’ Smart Grid Division has formed what it calls a “global strategic partnership” with big-data specialist Teradata, aimed at providing utility companies with more information about the status of their networks.

The companies say the alliance will allow customers of Siemens Smart Grid to improve the reliability of their infrastructure and reduce costs.

Siemens’ Smart Grid Division has formed what it calls a “global strategic partnership” with big-data specialist Teradata, aimed at providing utility companies with more information about the status of their networks.

The companies say the alliance will allow customers of Siemens Smart Grid to improve the reliability of their infrastructure and reduce costs.

“Based on the broadest smart-grid technology portfolio and our leading position in energy automation and meter data management, we know which data are key to an optimized operation of networks,” said Jan Mrosik, the chief executive of Siemens’ Smart Grid Division. “Combined with Teradata’s expertise in analytic data solutions, we can provide our customers with relevant and valuable information allowing them to make faster and significantly more informed decisions.”

The partnership will make use of Teradata’s Unified Data Architecture – a system designed to facilitate smarter data management, processing and the use of analytics.

The two companies say the transition from old-fashioned meters to smart meters has led to an explosion in the data travelling over utilities’ networks.

According to Teradata (Miami Township, OH, USA), 1 million smart meters can generate up to several petabytes of data each year.

Market-research company IMS Research reckons that 178 million smart energy meters have been installed worldwide and expects the number to rise to 343 million by 2016.

Teradata already serves large utility customers like Southern California Edison (Rosemead, CA, USA) and Oklahoma Gas and Electric (Oklahoma City, OK, USA) but claims the partnership with Siemens (Seoul, South Korea) will be the first to offer end-to-end integration of operational data with smart-meter data.

“Of course, just collecting and storing data doesn’t drive a cent of value to a utility’s bottom-line or help a utility’s customers understand their energy consumption,” said Hermann Wimmer, the president of Teradata’s international business.

“By integrating their data and running their analytics on the Teradata platform, utilities can apply intelligence to networks and use meter, asset and other sources of data to gain operational efficiency, improve service and increase customers satisfaction,” he said. “That’s where the real value lies.”