Nokia Siemens strengthens LTE portfolio

Equipment maker Nokia Siemens Networks (Helsinki, Finland) has strengthened its LTE offer by making its base stations compatible with frequencies used in the Asia-Pacific region and Latin America.

The frequencies fall in the 700MHz band and are being freed up for LTE as terrestrial television broadcasting moves from analogue to digital technology.

Japan, Australia and New Zealand are all reported to be interested in using the spectrum for LTE, while in parts of Latin America the frequencies are already being used to provide so-called 4G services.

Equipment maker Nokia Siemens Networks (Helsinki, Finland) has strengthened its LTE offer by making its base stations compatible with frequencies used in the Asia-Pacific region and Latin America.

The frequencies fall in the 700MHz band and are being freed up for LTE as terrestrial television broadcasting moves from analogue to digital technology.

Japan, Australia and New Zealand are all reported to be interested in using the spectrum for LTE, while in parts of Latin America the frequencies are already being used to provide so-called 4G services.

“We are excited to see the momentum in LTE adoption worldwide,” said Tero Peltola, the head of the LTE business line for Nokia Siemens Networks, in a statement. “With our expanded LTE portfolio, we are committed to helping operators take full advantage of LTE to meet bandwidth demand, offer their subscribers superior data rates and generate new revenue opportunities.”

While some commentators feel that 700MHz spectrum could become a globally accepted band for LTE deployments, solving the problem of spectrum fragmentation that bedevils the industry, the 700MHz band used in the Asia Pacific overlaps with frequencies already used by Europe’s 800MHz players.

The vendor has also launched a new load-balancing feature called Liquid Radio LTE, helping operators to distribute traffic across different LTE carriers as and when needed. Once LTE-Advanced becomes available, the load-balancing feature should also allow operators to boost the data speeds they provide to customers.

“We consider carrier aggregation as an essential functionality of LTE-Advanced,” said Kang Jong-Ryeol, senior vice president and head of the network R&D centre of South Korean operator SK Telecom (Seoul, South Korea). “As one of the world’s leading LTE operators, we are looking forward to providing our customers the superior data rates delivered by the technology.”