Nokia Siemens Networks sells WiMAX business

Reuters

Struggling mobile telecom equipment vendor Nokia Siemens Networks (Espoo, Finland) said on Tuesday it had agreed to sell its WiMax business to private-equity backed NewNet Communication Technologies (Shelton, Conn., U.S.A.).

The sale is the first for NSN since it last week announced plans to sell units and axe 17,000 jobs, nearly 25% of its workforce. The price of the deal - which includes the complete WiMAX product portfolio, the related employees and assets, as well as active customer and supplier contracts - was not disclosed.

FCC releases analysis on AT&T deal, AT&T responds

On Tuesday, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released a 109-page analysis and findings report on AT&T’s (Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.) proposed $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile USA (Bellevue, Wash., U.S.A.).  In the report, the FCC said the acquisition would limit competition and higher prices for customers.

AT&T, China Telecom expand partnership

Reuters

AT&T Inc (Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.) and China Telecom Corp Ltd (Beijing, P.R.C.) have agreed to expand their relationship in China and the United States and will look into supporting each other in other regions. AT&T said on Wednesday that the agreement would expand its services for business customers in China and that the companies would consider jointly developing services, including video conferencing and managed hosting.

They will also look at working together in other regions, according to AT&T, but it did not provide details.

Analysis: Sprint network upgrade may curb unlimited data plan

Reuters

Sprint Nextel (Overland Park, Kan., U.S.A.) may be forced to abandon the biggest advantage it has over its rivals - unlimited data services for a flat fee - because of heavy data users and a shortage of wireless airwaves.

Moreover, the increasing likelihood that AT&T's (Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.) plan to buy T-Mobile USA (Bellevue, Wash., U.S.A.), the nation's fourth-largest mobile operator, will fail may have the paradoxical result of making Sprint's position even more untenable, according to analysts who follow all three companies.

Blocking AT&T, T-Mobile deal could hurt rivals

Reuters

Driven by antitrust concerns, U.S. regulators are fighting hard to block AT&T's (Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.) $39 billion deal to buy Deutsche Telekom's (Bonn, Germany) T-Mobile USA. But, in an ironic twist, smaller U.S. wireless rivals may suffer more if the deal is blocked than if it is approved.

Samsung to be largest LTE macro base stations provider in Asia Pacific

Based on wireless operator LTE contracts and deployments, the dominant LTE equipment provider varies from year-to-year.  According to a recent report, Samsung (Seoul, South Korea) will be the dominant Asia Pacific LTE infrastructure provider in 2011, with over one-fourth of all LTE macro base station deployments in the Asia Pacific region, says NPD In-Stat (Scottsdale, Ariz., U.S.A.).

Cloud infrastructure equipment to exceed $33 billion in 2011

The cloud equipment market for the first half of 2011 exceeded $17 billion in sales and is expected to exceed $33 billion in 2011, according to a report by Synergy Research Group (Reno, Nev., U.S.A.)

FCC chief seeks added review on AT&T, T-Mobile deal

Reuters

AT&T Inc (Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.) was dealt a blow on Tuesday as the top U.S. communications regulator sought to have its planned $39 billion purchase of T-Mobile USA (Bellevue, Wash., U.S.A.) sent to an administrative law judge for review. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Julius Genachowski sent a draft order to his fellow commissioners, citing FCC staff findings that the deal would significantly diminish competition and lead to massive job losses.

Optical spectrum analyzers in next-gen networks

Several high-bandwidth networks have recently been upgraded to include reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers (ROADMs) to improve efficiency and flexibility. ROADMs allow networks to remotely change the amount of dropped or added wavelengths on the express route in order to optimize bandwidth—for example, by not dropping wavelengths when bandwidth is not required.

Using optical spectrum analyzers to measure next-generation networks: EXFO one-on-one

As service provides begin to deploy larger networks to increase bandwidth, new challenges are presented when measuring the optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR). When dealing with 40G and 100G networks, as well as with networks that contain reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers (ROADMs), the OSNR measurement reports often contain inaccurate results, which could result in potential network failures and higher OPEX.

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