Chinese seller of signal 'jammers' faces $35 million U.S. fine

CTS faces the largest fine FCC history after selling 10 high-power units to undercover agents

Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Chinese electronics maker C.T.S. Technology Co Ltd will face the largest fine in the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's history, of $34.9 million, for marketing illegal devices that block phone calls and other radio signals, the FCC said on Thursday.
U.S. law prohibits using, selling or marketing devices that block, jam or interfere with authorized radio signals such as telephone calls, GPS systems, Wi-Fi networks or first-responder communications.

US accuses China of cyber spying on American companies

Reuters

A U.S. grand jury has indicted five Chinese military officers on charges of hacking into American companies for information on nuclear plant design, solar manufacturing and other secrets in the toughest action taken by Washington to address cyber spying.

China denied the charges, saying they were "made up" and would damage trust between the two nations. The Chinese foreign ministry said it would suspend the activities of a Sino-U.S. Internet working group.

Huawei CEO says not surprised by US spying reports

Reuters

The founder of China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd said media reports that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) was spying on his company came as no surprise, and they would not damage its reputation among its customers.

The New York Times and Der Spiegel reported in March that documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden said the U.S. agency accessed servers at the company's Shenzhen headquarters to obtain sensitive data and monitor executives' communications.

China demands explanation from US on Huawei spying report

Reuters

China wants a clear explanation from Washington over a report that the U.S. National Security Agency infiltrated servers at the headquarters of telecoms giant Huawei Technologies Co., a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said on Monday.

Hong Lei, the spokesman, said China was "extremely concerned" about the spying allegations.

"Recently, the international media has put out a lot of reports about the eavesdropping, surveillance and stealing of secrets by the United States of other countries, including China," he told a regular briefing.

More than 20 million cars to ship with security software by 2020: ABI Research

More than 20 million connected cars will ship with built-in software-based security technology by 2020, according to a new study from ABI Research.

Although telematics safety services have typically focused on stolen vehicle tracking and diagnostics to physical protect vehicles, awareness is growing about the threat of cyber attacks and the risks these pose, especially given developments in vehicle-to-vehicle communications and autonomous vehicles.

In response, carmakers and suppliers are beginning to source security technology, says the market-research company.

Mobile carriers failed to use tech fixes to thwart spying: expert

Reuters

The world's mobile phone carriers have failed to implement technology fixes available since 2008 that would have thwarted the National Security Agency's ability to eavesdrop on many mobile phone calls, a cyber security expert says.

Karsten Nohl, chief scientist with Berlin's Security Research Labs, told Reuters ahead of a highly anticipated talk at a conference in Germany that his firm discovered the issue while reviewing security measures implemented by mobile operators around the world.

Mobile security gateway revenues to grow 70% this year: Infonetics Research

The global market for mobile security gateways is expected to generate $70 million in revenues this year, a 70% increase on sales in 2012, according to a new study from Infonetics Research.

“The popularity of SMS and MMS has soared over the last decade, but carriers around the globe are just now beginning to seriously evaluate and deploy SMS/MMS security gateway solutions, forced by economic, regulatory, and attack conditions,” said Jeff Wilson, principal analyst for security at Infonetics Research.

Deutsche Telekom to launch SaaS-based smart-metering kit

German telecoms operator Deutsche Telekom claims it will soon become the world’s first company to offer a modular solution for smart metering using so-called ‘software as a service’ (SaaS) technology.

The service will give utility companies a selection of tools for energy provision and management, and includes a gateway administration service, the installation of meters and gateways, the communications link, a meter data-management system and an IT system based on SAP (Walldorf, Germany), with which Deutsche Telekom (Bonn, Germany) has a long-standing partnership.

AT&T aims to sidestep shareholder request on surveillance data

Reuters

AT&T has asked regulators to let it ignore a shareholder request for details of its customer-information sharing with government agencies, a move that could forestall a heated debate at the telecommunications giant's annual meeting.

The No. 2 U.S. mobile operator made the request in a December 5 letter to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in response to shareholder activists pressing it on the matter. Among them is New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, who is the trustee of the state retirement fund.

US concern over Huawei telecoms deal with South Korea

Reuters

The heads of two U.S. Senate committees overseeing national security have expressed concern to the Obama administration over a recent network supply deal between China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd and Washington ally South Korea.

South Korea, which hosts some 28,000 U.S. soldiers to deter potential provocation from North Korea, said Huawei's (Shenzhen, China) deal to supply mobile network equipment does raise security concerns, but it had no immediate plan to look into the issue. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden is due to visit Seoul later this week as part of a broader Asia trip.

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