Cisco unveils new M2M processor

Hardware giant Cisco has taken the wraps off a new network processor designed to power so-called “Internet of Everything” applications.

The company said the new nPower X1 would deliver new levels of performance and bandwidth, besides programmable control through open APIs.

Cisco (San Jose, CA, USA) also claims the nPower X1 is the first processor capable of scaling to “multi-terabit performance levels” while also handling trillions of transactions.

Hardware giant Cisco has taken the wraps off a new network processor designed to power so-called “Internet of Everything” applications.

The company said the new nPower X1 would deliver new levels of performance and bandwidth, besides programmable control through open APIs.

Cisco (San Jose, CA, USA) also claims the nPower X1 is the first processor capable of scaling to “multi-terabit performance levels” while also handling trillions of transactions.

The processor has been purpose built for software-defined networking (SDN), which allows network upgrades and modifications to be made “on the fly” through the reprogramming of software.

The launch of the processor comes shortly after Cisco unveiled a new router aimed at connecting networks to devices like ATMs, vending machines and digital billboards.

The introduction of that router was seen by some analysts as Cisco’s first significant move in the M2M market, and the nPower X1 announcement suggests the company is making a concerted push in this area.

The processor is important due to the projected growth in the sheer volume of M2M transactions over the next few years.

Although many M2M applications do not gobble up bandwidth in the same way as mobile data services in the consumer market, they do rely on rapid and reliable processing capability.

Cisco says the nPower X1 will provide 400Gbps throughput and be able to support hundreds of millions of unique transactions per second.

The company also noted that it will enable solutions “with eight times the throughput and one quarter the power per bit compared with Cisco’s previous industry-leading network processor”.