Cinterion technology used to fight illegal deforestation in Brazil

Technology from M2M module maker Cinterion is being used in a pilot project aimed at thwarting illegal deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest.

Owned by Gemalto (Amsterdam, Netherlands), Cinterion (Munich, Germany) has been working with Brazilian technology company Cargo Tracck on a device that allows government officials to remotely track trees removed from protected areas.

Called Invisible Tracck, the device uses Cinterion’s BGS2 module in conjunction with local cellular networks to send location updates from sensors in trees to a central server.

Technology from M2M module maker Cinterion is being used in a pilot project aimed at thwarting illegal deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest.

Owned by Gemalto (Amsterdam, Netherlands), Cinterion (Munich, Germany) has been working with Brazilian technology company Cargo Tracck on a device that allows government officials to remotely track trees removed from protected areas.

Called Invisible Tracck, the device uses Cinterion’s BGS2 module in conjunction with local cellular networks to send location updates from sensors in trees to a central server.

The companies claim their solution has been able to detect unauthorized logging activities that were missed by traditional satellite surveillance and radio monitoring.

Smaller than a deck of cards, Invisible Tracck can be covertly installed in trees located in active harvesting areas and will send alarm notifications and precise location information to officials as soon as trees pass within 20 miles of a cellular network.

This allows police and agents from IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental protection agency, to trace the loggers to sawmills and prevent the sale of illegally harvested lumber.

Cinterion says its power management system allows devices to operate reliably in the field for more than a year without any need for recharging batteries – a claim that Cargo Tracck supports.

“Cinterion was vital in enabling us to develop a tracking and tracing solution rugged enough to withstand the heat and moisture of the Amazon,” said Marcelo Hayashi, general manager of Cargo Tracck. “Its M2M module is unique because it’s small for inconspicuous deployment in the field and power efficient enough to operate over long stretches of time without recharging batteries, which is crucial when tracking trees in remote areas.”