CeBIT 2011: Pacific Controls CEO details M2M activity in Dubai

Dilip Rahulan, Chairman and CEO of Pacific Controls (Dubai, UAE), offered a number of key insights during an M2M Zone panel discussion yesterday at CeBIT. The company’s home territory is a leader in the uptake of machine-to-machine connectivity.

Already, Pacific Controls has connected a whopping 60,000 buildings with M2M services, at an explosive rate of 120 buildings per day, according to Mr. Rahulan. He believes the overall infrastructure boom in Dubai is largely to thank for the echo-boom in M2M. As a result, projections for 2015 uptake have already been exceeded today.


Dilip Rahulan, Chairman and CEO of Pacific Controls (Dubai, UAE), offered a number of key insights during an M2M Zone panel discussion yesterday at CeBIT. The company’s home territory is a leader in the uptake of machine-to-machine connectivity.

Already, Pacific Controls has connected a whopping 60,000 buildings with M2M services, at an explosive rate of 120 buildings per day, according to Mr. Rahulan. He believes the overall infrastructure boom in Dubai is largely to thank for the echo-boom in M2M. As a result, projections for 2015 uptake have already been exceeded today.

But Pacific Controls’ strategy has also been a driver, and simplicity is the key. The company simply offers their service to every single building owner. They’ve also designed a financing scheme in which the cost savings that result from M2M optimization (usually 20-30%) are used to pay for the initial installation. This creates an “everyone wins” environment in which not only does each building owner have access to M2M, but they’d be foolish not to adopt it.

“The value proposition is unraveling as we go forward,” said Rahulan. In fact, nearly every new building sparks a new M2M application idea. This leads to multiplying revenue streams. For example, connected device tracking may eventually lead to data mining, which means more revenue. “We’re always learning,” Rahulan said.

Fergus O’Reily of SAP, another panelist, agreed. “We’re at the beginning of the overall innovation cycle,” he said. Core technologies still require more development time, “but then…the sky’s the limit.”

This was a frightening prospect to moderator Robin Duke-Woolley, founder and CEO of Beecham Research, who asked how we can avoid a “Big Brother” scenario going forward. For Rahulan, the early stage of M2M places the responsibility of self-regulation squarely on us, the pioneers. “There are no rules here yet, we are writing the rules,” said Rahulan, “and we must reach consensus to do so.”